Biz Tips: How to Find Missing Words and Themes from Your Blog’s Content — Applying SEO Tricks Towards…

Biz Tips: How to Find Missing Words and Themes from Your Blog’s Content — Applying SEO Tricks Towards…

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How to Find Missing Words and Themes from Your Blog’s Content — Applying SEO Tricks Towards…

How to Find Missing Words and Themes from Your Blog’s Content — Applying SEO Tricks Towards Comprehensive Writing

Professor Google — Source Lucas Amunategui

This simple and actionable approach can find missing words, keywords, and themes from your content. You simply choose up to 32 important words, often the title and first sentence or title and sub-title, drop it into a Google Search bar, and analyze the results. Whether you are looking for search engine optimization or simply want better coverage when writing about a topic, studying Google Search outputs can yield some very interesting information.

Professor Google

The SEO game is controlled by Google so it makes sense to go to the source and get schooled in what it constitutes as good themes around a particular topic of interest. Last I read, you can add up to 32 words in a Google search, so use that to your advantage and see what the cat drags in.

Both, Google or Bing, return little paragraphs of about 50 words for every recommendation. When you think about it, this is the output of some serious algorithmic horsepower — some of the smartest people behind these result sets are telling you that these are all prime, high-quality, and highly popular matches. It is also summarized by the search engine giant so you don’t have to click on each individual link. Doesn’t it make you wonder why we aren’t studying these more systematically?

My Experiment

The chart below shows the missing words from my experiment. I entered the following text from a previous article on learning to write titles that resonate with readers:

How to Write the Perfect Title That Ranks High on Searches and Generates Lots of Traffic. Optimize Your Choice of Words and Keywords to Rank High on Searches, Increase Traffic, and Reach More Conversions

Though these are all missing words from my submitted content, the top-right quadrant are more important than the lower-left. The x-axis shows the frequency of the word and the y-axis the uniqueness of the word. For example, the word ‘website’ is very different than the words ‘synonyms’ and ‘relevancy’, and ‘website’ has been found many more times than the other two.

You can try this tool out on ViralML.com

Tip #1

The words “blog” and “website” are missing from the content submitted. Make sure they’re included in your story as the search engine is telling you that the competition is using them heavily.

Tip #2

The words “longtail”, “genius”, and “organic” describe extremely valuable traffic types. If relevant to your story, these words and themes should be added as it will interest readers.

Tip#3

Analytics” is a good one, always nice to mention some scientific analysis behind the concepts and promises you are writing about.

Tip#4

The words “great”, “improve” and “fastest” kick up the excitement and value in the article and may be worth mentioning early on.

Automating For More Precision and Deeper Analysis

All this can be done manually, but for ease and speed, I built an experimental tool that you can freely use to try these concepts on your own content. Go to SEO Missing Words Finder — Find Important Missing Words From Your Title and Description on ViralML.com

Ideally, most of the themes should already be included in your post. But if you find missing ones, work them back into your title, description, first or last paragraph and even HTML tags if you control them (see http://www.viralml.com/ for more on these topics).

Get Your Actionable Tips from Three Easy Areas of Analysis

Harvest the first few result pages (don’t click on the individual links as you only need to analyze Google’s results) and paste them into a text editor. Scour it from top to bottom while ignoring the ads. Look at the words you are missing, then look for the common themes between each link. If your content doesn’t include these themes then collect them, as these are the gold nuggets you’ve been waiting for. Also of interest is to count how many times a theme is mentioned between result links — the bigger the count, the more important the theme for that topic.

Word Distance

Catalog the different themes from the search results and see which ones are missing from your content.

Frequency

Count important keywords in the search results.

Importance Amongst the Competition

A little harder to do manually, but see if you can count similar themes between search result links. When a lot of the results are talking about similar themes, it can be given more weight.

Conclusion

You can’t expect to include every theme and facet of a topic in 32 words so you are bound to find themes already covered in your content. Yet, even if the majority is already known, you may find a nugget or two that will better inform your readers and give you a ranking boost in the SEO game.

In the extreme case where none of the themes returned are included in your original snippets, then you have a problem. Either your title/description aren’t reflecting the way Google/Bing see that same topic or you are confusing things, either way, no matter who is wrong, you are stuck with a pickle — and if you want to be found in a search engine you may have to go back to your writing desk.

Go to SEO Missing Words Finder — Find Important Missing Words From Your Title and Description on ViralML.com to experiment with this approach.

ViralML.com

See How to Write the Perfect Title That Ranks High on Searches and Generates Lots of Traffic for more information on optimizing your titles and ViralML.com for more writing optimization tools and related articles.

Please share and clap if you found this helpful — thanks for reading!

Manuel Amunategui

Get it and plenty more at amunategui.github.io and at ViralML.com.

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